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Corpsmen keep more than knowledge alive | Health.mil

Corpsmen keep more than knowledge alive | Health.mil

Health.mil

Corpsmen keep more than knowledge alive

A corpsman checks for open wounds during a Tactical Combat Casualty Care training exercise. The TCCC is designed to give corpsmen the basic skills to work under pressure in a combat setting, ensure productive communication and save their patients’ lives. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Ashley Lawson)

A corpsman checks for open wounds during a Tactical Combat Casualty Care training exercise. The TCCC is designed to give corpsmen the basic skills to work under pressure in a combat setting, ensure productive communication and save their patients’ lives. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Ashley Lawson)



CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. — Recently, corpsmen with 2nd Medical Battalion participated in a Tactical Combat Casualty Care training exercise here.
The TCCC is designed to give corpsmen the basic skills to work under pressure in a combat setting, ensure productive communication and save their patients’ lives. 
The students conducted a patrol, experienced notional enemy contact and rushed to mannequins where they then dragged them out of the line of fire, gave appropriate care and transported them to an aircraft.
In an open field where injured mannequins lie was suddenly crowded as the recorded sound of a bomb reached the eardrums of corpsmen on a patrol nearby during a training exercise. With quick, sharp looks and a feeling of urgency, they each rushed to a wounded “Marine” to save their brothers’ lives.
“When taking care of injuries, they need to stop massive hemorrhaging in three minutes and relocate their patient out of the line of fire and to an aircraft in six to seven minutes,” said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Showalter, an instructor for Combat Trauma Management with 2nd Medical Battalion.
With Marines and Sailors constantly leaving Camp Lejeune for training exercises and deployments, the corpsmen are required to keep their fellow service members safe and pass on their knowledge.
“It’s important to apply medicine in a tactical setting and save lives as effectively as possible,” stated Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Emmanuel Pineda, an independent duty corpsman with Combat Logistics Regiment 25. “Those individuals will eventually end up in a clinical setting under the care of other corpsmen and it makes the cycle so much more effective.”
This training allows the corpsmen to be brought out of their comfort zone and discover more efficient ways of saving lives.
Once the training ended, the instructors went over ways to make the process more effective and how to take the new knowledge back to their units and share it.
The TCCC is one of many tools used to keep corpsmen up to date in their job field, as well as bolster combat readiness for possible deployments.
Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.


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