viernes, 3 de marzo de 2017

MMWR Vol. 66 / No. 8 ► Cancer Screening Test Use — United States, 2015 Weekly / March 3, 2017 / 66(8);201–206

Cancer Screening Test Use — United States, 2015 | MMWR
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MMWR Weekly
Vol. 66, No. 8
March 03, 2017


Cancer Screening Test Use — United States, 2015


Arica White, PhD1; Trevor D. Thompson1; Mary C. White, ScD1; Susan A. Sabatino, MD1; Janet de Moor, PhD2; Paul V. Doria-Rose, DVM, PhD2; Ann M. Geiger, PhD2; Lisa C. Richardson, MD1 (View author affiliations)
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Summary

What is already known about this topic?
Screening can lead to early detection of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer, when cancers might respond better to treatment, thereby reducing deaths. Healthy People 2020 (HP2020) set targets for screening based on recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Screening disparities exist for some groups defined by sociodemographics and access to health care.
What is added by this report?
Since 2013, some progress toward meeting the HP2020 objective for colorectal cancer screening has occurred, but the trend for breast cancer screening has been static, and cervical cancer screening is declining. Disparities in screening persisted by race, ethnicity, education, and income. The uninsured and persons without a usual source of care had screening use far below the HP2020 targets.
What are the implications for public health practice?
Progress toward achieving the HP2020 targets will require implementation of evidence-based interventions to increase cancer screening. Such interventions can be both provider- and patient-oriented. Screening among some racial and ethnic minorities and medically underserved populations is suboptimal and innovative approaches to eliminate these disparities might be needed.

Arica White, PhD1; Trevor D. Thompson1; Mary C. White, ScD1; Susan A. Sabatino, MD1; Janet de Moor, PhD2; Paul V. Doria-Rose, DVM, PhD2; Ann M. Geiger, PhD2; Lisa C. Richardson, MD1 (View author affiliations)
View suggested citation