viernes, 3 de marzo de 2017

MMWR Vol. 66 / No. 8 ► Reported Adverse Health Effects in Children from Ingestion of Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizers — United States, 2011–2014 Weekly / March 3, 2017 / 66(8);223–226

Reported Adverse Health Effects in Children from Ingestion of Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizers — United States, 2011–2014 | MMWR

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MMWR Weekly
Vol. 66, No. 8
March 03, 2017


Reported Adverse Health Effects in Children from Ingestion of Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizers — United States, 2011–2014


Cynthia Santos, MD1,2; Stephanie Kieszak, MPH1; Alice Wang, PhD1; Royal Law, PhD1; Joshua Schier, MD1,2; Amy Wolkin, DrPH3 (View author affiliations)
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Summary

What is already known about this topic?
Nonrecommended use of alcohol-based (alcohol) hand sanitizers, including intentional or unintentional ingestion, might be associated with greater health risks in young children than similar use of nonalcohol-based (nonalcohol) hand sanitizers.
What is added by this report?
During 2011–2014, 70,669 exposures to alcohol and nonalcohol hand sanitizers were reported in children aged ≤12 years to the National Poison Data System. Approximately 90% of these exposures occurred among children aged 0–5 years. Among that age group, 97% of exposures were oral ingestions. Children aged 6–12 years had more intentional exposures of alcohol hand sanitizers, suggesting this might be a potential product of abuse among older children. Older children also reported more symptoms and had worse outcomes than did younger children. Major (life-threatening) outcomes were rare. Seasonal trends in data might correlate with increased use during the school year or flu season.
What are the implications for public health practice?
Caregivers and health care providers need to be aware of the potential risks and dangers associated with improper use of hand sanitizer products among children and the need to use proper safety precautions to protect children. Increased parental or teacher supervision might be needed while using alcohol hand sanitizer products, especially for older children who might be abusing these products during the school year.


Cynthia Santos, MD1,2; Stephanie Kieszak, MPH1; Alice Wang, PhD1; Royal Law, PhD1; Joshua Schier, MD1,2; Amy Wolkin, DrPH3 (View author affiliations)
View suggested citation