martes, 14 de marzo de 2017

Overcoming Cultural and Service Gaps Supporting for Tribal Members within the Criminal Justice System

Overcoming Cultural and Service Gaps Supporting for Tribal Members within the Criminal Justice System

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March 15, 2017

Webinar: Overcoming Cultural and Service Gaps for Supporting Tribal Members Within the Criminal Justice System

Register for this webinar to learn how a collaborative response can expand services, create partnerships, and open the door to a more recovery-oriented continuum of services for tribal members.
March 17, 2017, and March 22, 2017
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Overcoming Cultural and Service Gaps Supporting for Tribal Members within the Criminal Justice System
Tribal members who  are dealing with behavioral health issues are finding themselves incarcerated rather than receiving recovery oriented services within their community . Frequently this lack of access can be contributed to the cultural and service gap that exists between tribal-delivered services and distrusting the services available outside the tribe; particularly those services that interface with the criminal justice system. The presenters will address how a collaborative response can expand services, create partnerships, and open the door to a more recovery oriented continuum of services. Service providers, across disciplines, will be able to apply this information to work they do with any community where cultural differences create greater vulnerability within both the behavioral health system and the criminal justice system.

Featured Presenters:
Alan “Jawenodee-Inini” Rabideau
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Alan “Jawenodee-Inini” Rabideau is a citizen of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, located in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. For the past 25 years, Alan has been working with youth, parents and their families in many different capacities. He has served as a school-based intervention specialist, adolescent substance abuse counselor, program manager of a residential based youth treatment program and a specialized or treatment foster parent. Mr. Rabideau has provided parent training to court ordered parents, foster parents and treatment foster care parents. Mr. Rabideau was also employed as a Quality Assurance Specialist for a large child-placing agency in Michigan where he was responsible for providing and coordinating pre-service, in-service and consultation to the agency’s programs and employees in the agency’s “model of care”. Currently Mr. Rabideau works as an independent consultant providing training and technical assistance to state, federal and tribal programs around children’s mental health initiatives, consumer, family and youth “driven” systems of care and positive behavioral support. Mr. Rabideau serves on the Board of Directors for the First Nations Behavioral Health Association and the Human Services Research Institute in Boston Massachusetts. Mr. Rabideau utilizes his cultural values and beliefs as an Anishinabe to help plan and advise programs so that they are culturally sensitive and strength-based. He has three grown foster/adoptive sons.
Stephanie Autumn
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Stephanie Autumn is a senior technical assistance consultant at the American Institutes for Research (AIR). She brings extensive experience in developing, implementing, and evaluating programs in Indian country. A member of the Hopi Tribe, Autumn has 38 years of local, national, and international advocacy and policy work experience, and has presented at various Human Rights forums at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland and in New York. She has worked throughout the country on issues of American Indian (AI) adult and juvenile justice, substance abuse prevention, restorative justice, and tribal youth mentoring programs.



Autumn’s expertise includes developing culturally competent strategic planning tools and trainings for American Indian/Alaska Native tribes. She has directed national projects on American Indian juvenile domestic assault, restorative justice, pre-and post-release services for AI offenders, tribal mentoring, and truancy. She recently served as project director for three Department of Justice (DOJ) funded programs for tribal youth which provided training and technical assistance to over 135 tribal grantees. Autumn has provided expertise/testimony for the Minnesota and South Dakota Departments of Corrections with regards to Traumatic Brain Injury and Trauma Informed Care needs/issues with incarcerated American Indian juvenile and adults. For the past fifteen years, Autumn has provided expertise to the Minnesota Department of Education on disproportionality issues that impact American Indian youth and communities.